Pairing of Digital Technologies Aims to Support Remote Clinical Trials

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by Patricia Inácio, PhD |

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Delve Health and Global Kinetics, two digital healthcare companies, are teaming up to simplify the remote monitoring, data collection and analysis of Parkinson’s disease patients enrolled in clinical studies.

“This partnership represents both companies’ commitment to providing Parkinson’s patients quality solutions that are user-friendly within the context of clinical trial participations,” Karen Krygier, vice president of Clinical Affairs & Business Development at Global Kinetics, said in a press release.

“The combined solution’s ease-of-use will not only enhance efficiencies in clinical trial operations … but it will also encourage patient retention and compliance with trial protocol requirements,” Krygier said.

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Clinical StudyPal, by Delve Health, is a patient-centered technology that works both as a mobile app and web-based platform. Specifically, it allows researchers to conduct remote patient monitoring and assess quickly if a patient matches a trial’s criteria.

It is also able to connect with wearable devices, making it easier for researchers to conduct long-term studies and collect data on patients without their needing to travel to a clinical site.

Clinical StudyPal is now connected with GK’s Personal KinetiGraph (PKG), a wearable motion sensor device that can measure and monitor Parkinson’s motor symptoms, including tremors, bradykinesia (slowness of movement) and the involuntary movements known as dyskinesia. It is worn on the wrist of the individual’s most affected side.

“Our partnership with GK and their PKG System for clinical trial use will allow for tremendous progress for the future of Parkinson’s clinical research,” said Wessam Sonbol, CEO of Delve Health.

The companies’ collaboration will increase “not only the amount of data collected, but improve the quality of data collected,” to allow researchers access to “real-world evidence in real-time,” Sonbol added. This will “ultimately improve Parkinson’s clinical research trials and the overall patient experience,” and provide “actionable data that other studies can build-on and advance to find a cure.”

The combination of the wearable device and Clinical StudyPal allows for the continuous, remote data collection of a patient’s motor function at their home,  the companies stated in the release. Moreover, it allows researchers to correlate motor activity with medication use, as the wearable device can be programmed to remind patients of their medication times and register when they’ve taken it.

Global Kinetics’ PKG is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved device to measure and monitor Parkinson’s motor symptoms.