Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

More Extensive GI Biopsy May Help in Diagnosing Parkinson’s

A more extensive biopsy involving larger tissue samples taken from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of people with Parkinson’s disease improves the ability to identify alpha-synuclein protein clumping, researchers in a small study reported. These findings support more extensive GI biopsies as a diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s and other…

Monocytes May Reflect Parkinson’s Response to Immune Therapy

Changes in gene activity and protein production were seen in immune cells known as monocytes from Parkinson’s disease patients before and after treatment with sargramostim, an immune-modulating therapy, a small study found. Because these changes were associated with gains in motor function, the researchers suggested that profiling how an immune therapy…

Supercomputer Simulations Shed Light on Dopamine Release

Proteins involved in nerve cell communication — via the release of signaling molecules such as dopamine, which is abnormally low in people with Parkinson’s disease — are “spring-loaded” in advance of a triggering signal by calcium, supercomputer simulations showed. These findings, which were consistent with current experimental data, may help…

Impaired Heart Rate Function Linked to Dementia in 5-Year Study

Impairment due to Parkinson’s disease of the involuntary nervous system, which controls heart rate, among other bodily functions, was associated with worse outcomes after five years — particularly relative to dementia, daily motor activities, and quality of life, a study suggested. In fact, worse cardiovascular assessment scores were linked to…

Denali’s DNL201 Safely Engages Target Enzyme: Multiple Studies

Denali Therapeutics‘ DNL201, an investigational therapy for Parkinson’s disease, was well tolerated in healthy volunteers and patients, and showed evidence of engaging its target protein, according to multiple preclinical and clinical studies. LRRK2, a protein associated with Parkinson’s, is also the target of BIIB122 (formerly DNL151), which is…

African Ancestry Seen to Affect Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number

People of African ancestry in South Africa with Parkinson’s disease have more copies of mitochondrial DNA within their cells than do people of similar ancestry without the condition, a study discovered. These findings contrast with studies in patients of Asian and European ancestry, who have fewer copy numbers than…

Female Hormone hCG Seen to Protect Key Neurons in Mouse Study

The female hormone known as chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) protects nerve cells in the brain that are lost in people with Parkinson’s disease, a mouse model study showed, reportedly for the first time. These findings suggest that hCG may be an effective therapeutic agent to slow Parkinson’s progression, its researchers…

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