Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Brain wave changes in sleep can predict levodopa-induced dyskinesia

People with Parkinson’s disease whose electrical brain wave activity declines more slowly during deep sleep develop levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID), or uncontrolled movements, faster, a study has found. These findings confirm a link between sleep-related brain wave activity and LID, and support the development of sleep-targeted therapies that may protect…

Brain Canada program supports pair starting in Parkinson’s research

Future Leaders in Canadian Brain Research, a Brain Canada program, has awarded two early-career scientists CA$100,000 (about $74,180) each in grants to advance research projects into Parkinson’s disease. Maria Ioannou, PhD, an assistant professor of physiology at the University of Alberta, is exploring alpha-synuclein protein clumping, a hallmark…

High dose of mesdopetam may ease levodopa-induced dyskinesia: Study

A high dose of the investigational oral therapy mesdopetam led to a significant and clinically meaningful reduction in levodopa-induced dyskinesia — the uncontrolled, involuntary movements and muscle stiffness common in Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing treatment — in a Phase 2 study, according to an in-depth examination of trial…

Plant-based diet may lower Parkinson’s risk

Adhering to healthy plant-based dietary patterns was associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, especially among older people, according to a large-scale U.K. study. A higher intake of vegetables, nuts, and tea in the regular diet is linked to the lowest Parkinson’s risk, data show. “These results…

Parkinson’s may be autoimmune disease in part, new study shows

Exposure to alpha-synuclein, a protein that accumulates in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients, led to inflammation and damage to nerve cells in the gut of mice carrying a human gene associated with several autoimmune disorders, a new study showed. Alpha-synuclein-related autoimmunity also induced constipation — a gut-related…

Racial disparities revealed in use of DBS, study shows

Racial disparities exist in the use of deep brain stimulation among people with Parkinson’s disease, a real-world claims study concluded. Compared to the proportion represented in the Medicare database, more people who identified as white, and fewer Black and Hispanic patients, underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s.

NT-0796 reduced inflammatory markers in older adults in 7 days

NodThera’s NT-0796, an investigational oral therapy for Parkinson’s disease, reduced several inflammatory markers in elderly volunteers in seven days, according to initial data from a Phase Ib/IIa study. Parkinson’s patients are now being recruited for the trial’s second phase to determine the therapy’s impact on a panel of clinical…

Naturally occurring UDCA improves motor abilities over 1 year

A year of daily treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid, led to small but significant improvements in motor abilities in adults with early Parkinson’s disease, a small Phase 2 study suggests. UDCA, already approved to treat a bile duct condition, also improved the function of…