Just Having a Laugh Could Be All You Need for This Moment

Just Having a Laugh Could Be All You Need for This Moment
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March is the month that amuses us with many things, besides the infamous St. Patrick’s Day. You know, that day in the middle of the month when we dress up in green to avoid being pinched. The month is celebrated for much more than green attire, four-leaf clovers, leprechauns, and pickled beef brisket.

March also is a month set aside to bring awareness to many health issues such as tuberculosis, cerebral palsy, endometriosis, and multiple sclerosis.

However, the days I will focus on here are ones that — I hope — will cheer you up if you’re down. If you are struggling, I hope they will encourage you. And I hope they will remind you that we are all on this journey together, and you are not alone.

March 2 is for old stuff

Did you know there is a day set aside for bringing attention to your old stuff? Actually, it could be your grandmother’s old stuff for all we know. Nobody specified whose old stuff we were to be made aware of. So, heeding the call to acknowledge old stuff, make some time this month — at least one day — to go through some old stuff. Bring out the photo albums or the box of mementos that are buried under the bed and reflect on or relive moments of the good memories you have shared with the people you love.

March 18 is Awkward Moments Day

For those of us who carry out or witness awkward moments: Yes, someone else does awkward things, too. I’m not too sure we need to bring to attention to all of these things, but here is one of my awkward moments: farting out loud in the presence of one, two, or three other people.

Whether we would choose to admit it or not, we all probably have had personal experiences with the production and secretion of bodily air. But have you ever been on the other side of the experience? The side where you are listening to someone needing to release that foul gust? And not just a little to tide them over until they get somewhere more socially acceptable, but a humongous toot (or maybe a honk at this point). A toot turned honk that could be heard clear into the next room? A continuous honk that may have well lasted over a good 20 seconds?

Well, I have. And so have seven other witnesses. It still makes all who were there laugh.

Get over it, get laughing, and be happy

Mid-March brings with it three days of awareness that I like best: Get Over It Day, Let’s Laugh Day, and International Day of Happiness.

Get over it, eh? A failed relationship? Being wronged by someone you trusted? Perhaps you’ve been lied to? Or, do you feel cheated, left out, and overlooked? According to your rules, things haven’t been fair. You want a do-over.

If you could laugh with as much energy as you spend mulling over the unfairness in your life, would you? Could you do it with the remaining energy from sulking, or have you almost depleted your laughter and happiness accounts? Is it time to let go?

I am not, in any way, making light of what you are going through. The agony of infidelity, of losing a loved one, or of being diagnosed with an incurable chronic disease is excruciatingly painful. You have to find somewhere to laugh somehow, and have someone to laugh with.

My husband and I often watch a show on YouTube called “Dry Bar Comedy.” It is good, clean humor that makes us laugh. Listen to the people in the audience laughing. On several occasions, we have started laughing hysterically just because the audience is having such a good time. Watching, listening to, or being around others who are genuinely laughing is contagious, and before you know it, you are laughing, too.

It wouldn’t hurt anything to try some of these ideas. In fact, it might help. Go through the old pictures and laugh. Laugh about the awkward things you’ve done. Just laugh.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

Sherri was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease over 15 years ago. She can be found working in her garden, going for walks, taking pictures, or reading books to her three favorite grandkids. Sherri is taking life somewhat slower, and perhaps with guarded steps, but she’s not giving in.
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Sherri was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease over 15 years ago. She can be found working in her garden, going for walks, taking pictures, or reading books to her three favorite grandkids. Sherri is taking life somewhat slower, and perhaps with guarded steps, but she’s not giving in.

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