Kizik and Parkinson’s Foundation Partner to Make Hands-free Shoes More Available

Kizik and Parkinson’s Foundation Partner to Make Hands-free Shoes More Available
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A partnership between Kizik and the Parkinson’s Foundation aims to make the company’s hands-free shoes more available to Parkinson’s patients.

The collaboration includes a Kizik donation of an unspecified amount to the nonprofit organization. And it is in keeping with the foundation’s goal of making life better for those with Parkinson’s disease.

“At Kizik, our mission is to make putting on and taking off shoes easier for everyone — and in particular for individuals who live with conditions that make tying shoes difficult or impossible,” Monte Deere, Kizik CEO, said in a press release.

“We are honored to partner with the Parkinson’s Foundation, and we believe this collaboration will enable us to make life easier for millions of people.”

Symptoms of this progressive neurodegenerative disease include rigidity and a slowing of physical movement, which can make everyday life challenging. Simply getting dressed can be tiring and laborious.

Kizik shoes are based on its Foot Activated Shoe Technology, which the company refers to as F.A.S.T., and have a functionality and design of benefit to people with Parkinson’s, the company states. There’s no need to not bend down to put on the handcrafted shoes, or to rely on long shoe horns or family members for help. People can step into each shoe in one motion.

The shoes’ insoles are made from high-density foam designed for support and comfort. That can be helpful to patients having problems with gait and balance.

Kizik has a webpage dedicated to Parkinson’s, its support of the Parkinson’s Foundation, and its shoes, which resemble athletic footwear.

“Sometimes Parkinson’s disease can complicate the basic daily activities a person living with Parkinson’s once did easily, like bathing, dressing, eating, sleeping, and even walking,” the company states on the page. “[The] tremors, rigidity, and unbalance that often come with Parkinson’s can feel like a setback to a ‘normal’ life.

“The truth is that the management of these symptoms is no simple task. That’s why we want to help remove one of the challenges they present.”

Kizik states that the shoes’ ease of use can be particularly welcoming during “off episodes,” the period when symptoms recur as the Parkinson’s medication levodopa wears off and a new dose cannot yet be taken.

“My husband has Parkinson’s and has a hard time putting shoes on,” Linda B. states on Kizik’s webpage. “This is the second pair of these I have ordered for him and they work magic. We both love them.”

A testimonial video of Kizik shoes, their ease of use and comfort, by Scott Rider, diagnosed with Parkinson’s about 14 years ago, is also available on the webpage.

The Parkinson’s Foundation’s stated mission is to make life better for people with Parkinson’s disease by improving care and advancing research toward a cure.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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Ana holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Lisbon and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) in Lisbon, Portugal. She graduated with a BSc in Genetics from the University of Newcastle and received a Masters in Biomolecular Archaeology from the University of Manchester, England. After leaving the lab to pursue a career in Science Communication, she served as the Director of Science Communication at iMM.
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Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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