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    • #14487
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      The saying goes: “If you’ve seen one case of PD, you’ve seen one case of PD”  We are all different in terms of how this disease affects us.  For me, my quality of life is most impacted by extreme fatigue.  I try not to make too many commitments, especially for the afternoons when I am really tired.    What symptom impacts your the most?  How do you deal with it?

    • #14646
      Lou Hevly
      Participant

      The only real symptom that affects me is Restless Legs Syndrome, and the Mirapex pretty much solves that.

    • #14650
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      Lou, that is great that you are able to keep your symptoms under control.  I cant seem to shake this total fatigue I experience; now it seems to start as soon as I get out of bed.

    • #14709
      Marcus Sutherland
      Participant

      Tremor definitely is the worst! Anxiety that comes out of nowhere hard to schedule meals around medication.

      • #14759
        Ally
        Keymaster

        Marcus, is the anxiety related to PD or have you always experienced it? I have a hormonal mood disorder that manifests as anxiety and I’m wondering if long-term use of SSRIs to deal with it will be damaging to my brain, but I also don’t want to live with anxiety. Have you found any coping mechanisms that help?

    • #14714
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      i do not experience external tremors, only internal.  i can even imagine what having external tremors must be like.  anxiety is a new one for me, but cbd oil usually can calm me down..

    • #14722
      Manuel Fernandez
      Participant

      Besides the shattering impact of being diagnosed with PD and undergoing the ensuing effects, there are nevertheless aspects of the resulting new life that, strangely enough, rather improve on our quality of life. Four years ago, when my doctor detected a suspicion of PD she asked me what I was currently doing with my life. I told her I had retired 10 years ago and had spent those years mostly sitting in front of a monitor writing up my research work for publication. She wisely told me: “Well, now you must stop doing that and start using your body. Walk, jump, dance, work with your hands, be active; that’s what your body is made for.” Overburdened with fears then I did stop my editing work and, at 78 years of age returned to my earliest trade: I was originally a carpenter 60 years ago, so I began by building a stock of power and hand tools and began to make small items of furniture I felt were missing in our house. Working with extreme care, my trembling hands did not produce any self-injury when handling power tools and I could even use sharp chisels keeping all my ten fingers intact. Even when PD did not exist for me, I never thought to be able to do/make manual crafts. My garden also benefited from my PD as well as my self-esteem and I must thank PD for that. I have come back to my writing up now but never for more than four hours in the day. Attaching a felt pad below my mouse avoids the effects of my shaking and I no longer get multiple identical characters when trying to key-in just one on my keyboard.

      • #14726
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        that is outstanding Manuel.  I am sure your positive outlook has served you well in dealing with this disease.

      • #14758
        Ally
        Keymaster

        It sounds like you have a really wonderful (and astute) physician, Manuel. Thank you for sharing your experience. It will likely help someone else in the early stages of their diagnosis.

    • #14728
      Manuel Fernandez
      Participant

      I was hesitant to write what I wrote Jean. I have two close friends who also suffer from PD and the state is so advanced that it would be utterly impossible to do any of the things I mentioned. Maybe I should have added that everything I do has required special arrangements. I do my gardening mostly sitting on a stool, I am writing this with a pillow on my lap so as to support my arms and keep my hand steady and I always keep at hand a walking frame, although I have no difficulties in walking on my own, albeit hesitantly.

      • #14729
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        Manuel. What you wrote is fine.  It can give many of us hope.  Your fighting attitude in not letting this disease stop you from living your life is admirable and inspirational.  We are all affected so differently by this disease.

    • #16269
      TimR
      Participant

      For me it’s tremors in my left hand.  The only med I’m on is Azilect, and while it doesn’t completely eliminate my tremors, it gives me hope I can prolong period till I need LDopa.

      If I’m busy in my workshop, tremors all but gone.  But, if someone shows up and especially if a stressful situation pops up, they can come back mild to ferocious. A few deep breaths or perhaps grab a worry stone from my pocket and things ease up.

      Toward end of day, sitting on couch, typically they come back mildly especially when I remember I have PD

    • #16283
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      tim, there are several schools of thought on when to start C/L.  one is that if it improves quality of life, go for it and hope for a cure soon.  others say it can bring on dyskinesia.  you seemed to have found something that takes your mind off pd.  bravo!   the jury is still out for me. I am on c/l and i hate it.

    • #16287
      TimR
      Participant

      Jean, totally get the take it and hope. I hope to for any number of breakthroughs: Halt progression, halt and repair damage/wiring, next wonder drug to be “Platinum standard “ of care vs C/L.

      I might be among those who could take a low to moderate dose of C/L for a long time without complications , but being 60, too many potential years left, and still able to do most anything except deal with stressful situations.

      • #16291
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        stess wreaks havoc with my symptoms, glad i am retired..  even the stress of extreme weather affects me :0

        • #16334
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Stress is horrible for me, too, Jean, including the stress of the changing seasons (especially winter!). Although getting stressed out may not be a symptom in and of itself, it certainly makes all the other symptoms much worse (particularly tremors).

        • #16343
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo, heavy humidity and heat do me in to.   i find i stress a lot more now since i have pd 🙁   i feel like i have lost my strength and feel weak, therefore vulnerable and stressed

        • #16354
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Yup. Everything stresses me more too, Jean, and I also feel weaker and more vulnerable. Exercising helps me feel stronger (even if I’m not, really), but I still feel vulnerable.

        • #16358
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo,

          vulnerability, something i have not really felt prior to pd…

        • #16360
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Jean, I’ve always been small (but mighty!), so I guess I’ve always felt a bit vulnerable. But, yes, PD definitely makes that (and everything else) so much worse.

        • #16365
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo, yes it does, if one is having a bad day, is it the weather, is it the stressful situation you just had, is it something you ate, was it a bad nights sleep, timing of meds and eating…

    • #16296
      HMargulies
      Participant

      Leg rigidity and toe curling are high on my list of misery producing symptoms. It makes walking difficult and has gotten so bad that driving is now near impossible; it’s my right leg that’s affected. I actually used to enjoy driving. Now I have trouble lifting my leg off the accelerator and pressing down on the brake. Tremor is obviously unpleasant but this aspect of PD is unexpectedly problematic.

      • #16297
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        HM

        sorry to hear of your struggles.  Is your right arm impaired as well? My dominant side is right, luckily, it is my left side affected by pd

    • #16299
      HMargulies
      Participant

      Yes, Jean. My right arm now has a life of its own. Putting on a jacket is now a hilarious production where I try not to look like a challenged five year old. Sometimes I think to myself, I once knew how to put on a jacket, right? Also, here’s a weird thing: my handwriting has gotten extremely teeny–but I can still draw cartoon illustrations in the same style I used 30 years ago. This is some wacko disease.

      • #16300
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        hi HM, i have the same problem with my left arm where putting on a jacket is a challenge.  i am writing a blog about getting dressed with pd which should be published in january which you may relate to.  sports bras are my true nemesis LOL

    • #16308
      Carol Rothfeld
      Participant

      Tremors and balance problems are most difficult for me. The tremors that started in my right hand seven years ago have progressed to both hands and legs and sometimes I feel it in my core.

       

    • #16310
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      carol, thnx for sharing.  i have had internal tremors and it really sux… people think you are fine, but you are falling apart inside.

    • #16311
      Carol Rothfeld
      Participant

      I “love” it when someone says but you look fine.  I have been breeding show cats since 1980. I can no longer go to shows because of the balance problem I can’t carry my cat to a ring and use the walker. My husband and I are now thinking of placing most of my show cats in pet homes.

       

      • #16337
        HMargulies
        Participant

        Hi Carol. Your comment “I “love” it when someone says but you look fine” really hit home. A friend who is dealing with late-stage lymphoma was told just that by a stranger who questioned the legitimacy of her handicapped parking pass! People can be really dumb–of course, until it’s affecting them. Empathy is a dying trait in modern humanity.

         

        • #16393
          Ally
          Keymaster

          That’s awful. I wish people would be more mindful of the fact that disability isn’t always visible. How did your friend respond when that happened? My friend has PF and always worries about people judging her for taking elevators etc. when she doesn’t have her portable oxygen with her because she looks young and healthy. In fact, she’s not. People need to be less judgmental.

      • #16394
        Ally
        Keymaster

        Carol, this is off-topic but I LOVE cats and would love to hear more about your experience breeding and showing them!

    • #16314
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      carol, i am so sorry to hear you may  have to give up your cats.  it must be a very difficult decision for you

    • #16333
      Jo S.
      Participant

      For me, extreme fatigue (usually in the afternoon and early evening) is a huge problem. I don’t want to go out in the evening because I might fall asleep standing up (or sitting down). I’m used to my tremor (I’ve lived with essential tremor for 20 years prior to my PD tremor and diagnosis), and although it’s a royal pain in the butt, I’ve learned how to manage and work around it for the most part.

      Considering everything, though, I guess I’d have to say that restless legs syndrome — mostly at night but also often during the day! — probably impacts my quality of the life the most (along with insomnia). I’ve got lots of other symptoms that are terribly intrusive as well, so it’s tough to pick just one! 😀

      • #16344
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        jo, you are so right, there is a plethora of troublesome symptoms to choose from.  my latest is my ability to swallow and speak without slurring..

        • #16352
          Jo S.
          Participant

          I was going to mention swallowing and speech, Jean … but I started speech therapy a couple of weeks ago, and I’m optimistic that will help on both fronts. I don’t have slurring — but I do get hoarse and have soft speech. Are you able to go to speech therapy or is that too far to travel for you?

        • #16357
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo, yes, i am in process of looking for a speech therapist,  ithink i will need to go a few times, then i can do exercises at home… one more thing to add to the list… good think i am retired.

        • #16361
          Jo S.
          Participant

          That’s great, Jean — good for you! They are giving me exercises to do after each session, along with lots of helpful tips. Doing the exercises (they take a fair amount of time!) and following the tips is the hard part. You’ll be glad you did it. The speech therapist asked me what I would do if I retired (I’m still working full time), and I said, “Devote my retirement to PD stuff — exercise, support groups, therapy, etc.” Honestly, it’s a full-time job having PD, isn’t it?!

        • #16364
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo

          i give you a lot of credit working full time with this disease.   i dont think i could do it.  you are right, having PD  is a full time job.  i had planned to cut back on my workouts when i retired from my 9-5 job  ( I was a cyclist and a dancer).  then pd came along…

        • #16373
          Jo S.
          Participant

          You were a professional cyclist and dancer, Jean? I’m in awe!!!

        • #16377
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo, no need to be in awe 🙂  i was never a professional as i had a day job that paid the bills.  i danced with a local company in the 1980s/1990s and my late husband was an Ironman triathlete, so i was always surrounded by  and trained with athletes.

        • #16384
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Well, I’m in awe of you anyway, Jean! 😀

        • #16385
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          jo, mutual admiration club LOL  i just saw your post on your workout routine.  i got tired as i read it!

        • #16386
          Jo S.
          Participant

          LOL! I’m glad my routine sounds impressive. 😀 Some days I skip the walk or mini tramp (it’s so hard to get motivated, especially later in the day for me), but I try to keep on track most of the time. Still, dance is such a beautiful art form as well as great exercise, and moving to music is wonderful for PD. Do you still try to dance?

        • #16387
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          lack of motivation plagues me.. as for dance, i have not gone back to it, i have lost so much to pd; balance, rhythm, flexibility, it frustrates me so and i start getting stressed out.  i am enjoying my boxing classes though it is getting harder and harder to do them 🙁

        • #16388
          Jo S.
          Participant

          I’m so sorry that PD took dance away from you and that boxing has become more difficult as well. :'(

        • #16389
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          thank you Jo, my issues are no worse than any others who have PD.  PD is a crushing disease of loss and everyone suffers in their own unique way.

        • #16390
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Sadly, that is so true, Jean.

        • #16566
          Garrett McAuliffe
          Participant

          I too am working virtually full-time 10 years after I was diagnosed, which means 20 years after I Started with PD. I am a full-time professor. I can work at home a lot preparing classes and do a research. I teach also and do a lot with meetings and other things like that. I often can’t work. Stress is a significant factor. I need to do mindfulness meditation and gave him a tree relaxation to calm down the symptoms, which worked. I only had to miss one class because of PD this last semester. But I get half the work done that I used to get done. Concentrating on a task increases my symptoms I often can’t type which is the basis for most of my work.I have various symptoms, including what feels like dyskinesia plus tremor when I stay too active and stressed and don’t take it easy. I hope to work for five more years that would be 15 years after my diagnosis and I’ll be 76 years old and I’m now 71. I don’t know what I would do without this work. The scariest thing about Parkinson’s is that you can see the loss of interest, career, colleagues, hobbies, friendships, and even a partner, which makes up the meanings of life. So I’m hanging on by thread but hanging on!

    • #16348
      James Harvey
      Participant

      Fatigue and insomnia are my major problems.  For insomnia, I installed blackout blinds so I could sleep in the morning.  Also, I have recently tried eliminating caffeine (e.g., chocolate) after 3 pm and having a schedule of events leading up to being in bed by 11 pm.  My schedule is 4pm home exercises, 6pm dinner, 8pm aerobic exercise (treadmill, etc), 10pm prepare for bed.  Of course the schedule is not absolute but I try to adhere.

      • #16353
        Jo S.
        Participant

        Fatigue and insomnia are killers for me too, James. I’m up at 4:30 a.m. to do yoga (although I’m usually awake long before that). I try to get my exercise done early in the day, as by afternoon, I’m too exhausted to do it. I also installed blackout curtains in the bedroom — best decision ever (or one of them, at least). By the time you’re ready to do your nighttime aerobic exercise, I’m getting ready for bed! 😀

        • #16395
          Ally
          Keymaster

          Hi Jo, were you always an early riser or is that something new?

        • #16398
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Hi, Ally. I’ve always been an early riser … just not THIS early! 😀 Insomnia was among my (many) first symptoms several years ago. Now I start to fall over (not literally fall, but fall asleep fall) around 7:30 p.m., though I force myself to stay awake for another hour (if I can). Of course, the irony is that I wake up in the middle of the night, eyes wide open, for hours on end.

    • #16349
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      hi james, thanks for sharing.  has your schedule helped with your fatigue and insomnia?

    • #16366
      Frank Mundo
      Participant

      What has your neurologist told you about swallowing ?

      I am very interested in swallowing.  90% of PwP’s experience swallowing problems at some point during their illness.  What advice has your neurologist given you an the following points:

      1. How to determine whether or not you have a swallowing problem? The symptoms,tests that can be run,

      2. Are there any strengthening exercises or therapies to improve swallowing?

      Thanks for your help.

      Frank

      • #16367
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        hi frank, neuro gave me rx for  swallow test and speech therapy.  i have a problem swallowing pills and sometimes, i get food stuck in my throat.  i always have a glass of water nearby when i eat.   swallow test showed some atrophy since i had radiation to the neck in 2007, but otherwise normal.  however, i know i have a problem swallowing, hence the speech therapy rx.

      • #16368
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        Hi frank, I forgot to mention, if you go to a speech therapist, try to find one certified in LSVT. https://www.lsvtglobal.com/Therapists_Professionals       They specialize in working with pd patients

    • #16369
      Frank Mundo
      Participant

      Thanks Jean. Did the speech therapist offer any exercises to strengthen swallowing muscles or expiration muscles? or provide any tips or advice on how to handle your swallowing, like for example how to prepare food or position your head when you try to swallow?

      • #16372
        Jo S.
        Participant

        Hi, Frank. I’m going to speech therapy as we speak (actually, I’m leaving for there in a few minutes). Yes, the therapist will give you tips (and homework!) for how to strengthen your swallowing muscles, how to prepare food, and how (and what) to eat. Make sure you go to one with a neuro background or specialty in PD. It will be well worth going!

    • #16370
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      Frank. I am still trying to find a speech therapist.   (I live in the sticks lol). Have u googled or searched in utube for answers to your questions.  There seems to be videos on how to do anything  in utube.

      • #16371
        Gregg I Daniels
        Participant

        I am 69 and have had PD for almost 8 years. Right hand tremor and difficulty staying asleep are the problems. I take 4 c/l tabs a day and azilect. We are getting ready for a major move and my 44 year old learning disabled daughter who is also mildly schizophrenic has been living with us for the past year. Stress certainly increases the symptoms. I have always been active and moderately athletic so I try to stay in shape as best possible. I raced motorcycles until I was 58. I no longer race but still ride street motorcycles, dirt bikes and mountain bikes. The c/l works fairly well but I am at the point of needing to increase the dosage. Seriously considering dbs within the next year to better control the tremor. I am not ready to give up the motorcycles and downhill mountain biking. The need for speed is inborn I guess.

        • #16376
          Jean Mellano
          Keymaster

          greg, isnt it ironic how this disease gives us symptoms that impact one of  the things we love to do… in your case, you love speed and one of the symptoms of pd is bradykinesia (slowness of movement), in my case, loss of balance as i was a dancer .   you are fighting the good fight… power to you.

        • #16396
          Ally
          Keymaster

          Happy to hear you can still enjoy some of the activities that bring you joy, Gregg. 🙂 I hope that remains for a long while yet.

    • #16415
      Joe Ferguson
      Participant

      I was getting some ED in the year before dx, but it was not total. My spouse and I were actually managing pretty well in spite of it. The first year and a half after dx remained the same. Then recently it went out pretty badly and now I can clearly state it has negatively affected our quality of life! I had been calling my increased drive the silver lining of my PD cloud, and thinking positively that way, but going forward I’m not sure how I’m going to look at this. I have been faithfully doing the hard exercise since my dx 18 months ago, so I am doing my part in good faith!

      • #16419
        Jean Mellano
        Keymaster

        Joe   I am glad you have a supportive spouse… if you take a look at all the responses to this post, we are all so different with our symptoms.. crazy disease

    • #16431
      Russ Hudson
      Participant

      My PD symptoms have been cured. How? Butyric Acid supplements. I take 12 pills a day, and I feel great. I highly recommend it ….

      • #16432
        Jo S.
        Participant

        Russ, do you not take any PD medications at all? What brand of Butyric Acid do you take? That’s a lot of pills — how do you spread them out throughout the day? Did you ever take PD meds? If so, did you take the Butyric Acid along with them? Please tell us more!

    • #16458
      Russ Hudson
      Participant

      I don’t take any PD medicines at all. In September 2018, I decided to Google PD symptoms, as my left thumb kept twitching and I had other symptoms. I found I had most of the symptoms. I then decided to Google, “latest treatments for PD,” and that’s when I found this article. https://www.foundationalmedicinereview.com/blog/the-potential-of-butyric-acid-as-an-alternative-treatment-for-parkinsons-disease/

      I buy butyric acid pills on line from jigsaw health (Butyrex® by T.E.Neesby). I take six pills in the morning and six in the evening. All my PD symptoms have abated, including the tremor in my left thumb.

    • #16586
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      Russ I am glad u found relief. It seems like there are mantpy people that get symptom relief from various supplements. Unfortunately, I have tried many but none seem to work

    • #16587
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      Garrett

       

      apathy is a pd symptom.  I am glad u find joy in your work. It is probably better than any drug for u.

       

      Stress always exacerbated my symptoms too.  Hang in there….

    • #16636
      Dan
      Participant

      Muscle rigidity, motor function. Many tasks are becoming just beyond my ability to do. No more climbing on the roof, guitar is difficult, hunting is out. Mechanical repairs, additions to trucks and 4×4 vehicles result in questions like “What in the world?”

    • #16637
      Frank Mundo
      Participant

      I was diagnosed in 2014.  The most annoying symptom then  was dragging the heel of my left foot. Top one these days has to be urinary urgency.  Amusingly appropriate is the label “latchkey incontinence” as it manifests itself in its most extreme form when I arrive home and pull in the garage . . . requiring a virtual sprint to the bathroom when I arrive.  I’m sure its related to some sort of “conditioning.”  Mornings are worst times, when my dopamine level is low.

    • #16645
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      dan, i can relate to loss of motor skills, my typing and handwriting are horrendous and when i tried to play ukulele, i could never tell if my fingers were hitting the chords..

    • #16646
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      wow frank, i totally relate to urinary urgency.  it always gets worse the closer i get to the bathroom.  if you figure out proper conditioning for that, LMK.

    • #16650
      Laura
      Participant

      The symptom  that impacts me the most is definitely my balance issues, it makes it hard to walk and move around freely. When I’m out I usually always walk with my hand on someone’s arm for reassurance, but for those rare occasions now when all my meds are hitting the mark at the right time, then I will walk completely  on my own for as long as it last. Also, like many have said already, there’s the bladder issues and extreme fatigue, which starts by late afternoon, if I sit down doing nothing, I will start to fall asleep, so I try to keep busy till at least early evening, most nights I fall sound asleep between 8 -10. I will sleep about 5 hours, then I wake up realizing it’s not the next morning, lol, now I’ll be up for hours. I’ll get up and do things, to stay busy, that I would have done if I hadn’t fallen asleep like wash and dry clothes and ironing. I’m dozing off right now as I type, tme to close my eyes.

       

       

       

    • #16651
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      laura

      thnx for sharing.  it is amazing how we are all so different in our experiences.  my fatigue does not make me sleepy, just a feeling of i cant move or do anything.

    • #16690
      Dan Freedman
      Participant

      For me, it is the recognition that my carbidopa/levidopa medications have effects on my moods. While it might sound nice to be able to dial oneself up or down in terms of mood, it does beg the question (within me at least) about who I truly am. I try to observe myself and my mental reaction to medication, but there is always a question: Who is making this decision (whatever it is)? Me, or the meds.

      Dan

    • #16700
      Maria Cesena
      Participant

      I’m relatively new to this site and am joining rather late to the discussion about what PD symptom most impacts the quality of my life and I’d have to say it’s the severe insomnia. I’ve just recently been officially diagnosed with PD but was told that I’ve probably have had it for the past 12 to 13 years with relatively mild symptoms, well, what the neurologist considers mild symptoms.

      I’ve had severe, extreme insomnia that is resistant to medication, natural supplements, holistic medicine, alternative therapy like acupuncture and etc., etc.

      This, of course leads to chronic fatigue. I continue to work but it’s with a huge effort. This upcoming Saturday I will be celebrating my 53rd birthday. If, I could retire with full medical benefits and at a reasonable monthly pension benefit at 55-years old I’d feel a bit better.

      Because I’m so exhausted all the time, I’ve become a virtual introvert. I literally have not had a date in six-years since my divorce in 2013. My companion is my cat, Mozart. I have two adult children,one who lives out of state and the other extremely running his own business. I don’t mind too terribly they don’t have much time for me.

      I’m too tired to engage in my once favored activities. PD is so life-altering. However, my daughter has told me not to let it define who I am. So, it’s just another component of my life. It’s rather simplistic of her to say.

      I pray for the day that I can sleep for more than 2 to 3 hours at night. It affects all aspects of life. How can I trust myself to drive, my memory, to make important decisions, to keep my body well so the other PD symptoms aren’t so problematic.  Sleep is so important for our well-being.  This extreme insomnia has taken away any semblance of normalcy in my life.

      It can’t be a unique experience to me. Others with PD must have encountered this issue at some point or another though I understand PD is different for each and every one of us.

      I would like to engage in life once more and perhaps even venture out of my introverted self. Any stories, encouragement, or solutions?

      • #16701
        Lou Hevly
        Participant

        Hi Maria:
        I’m 70 and was diagnosed with PD 4 1/2 years ago. Most of my symptoms are mild, but my Restless Legs Syndrome gets really bad if I don’t take meds. I have sporadic periods of insomnia, occasionally staying awake all night. Lately I’ve been sleeping better, perhaps due to a med schedule change. Specifically:
        6-8am 1/2mg Sinemet, 0.26mg Mirapexin
        1-3pm 1 mg Sinemet
        7-9pm 1 mg Sinemet, 1 mg Azilec
        12-1am (just before bed) 1/2 mg Sinemet
        You don’t mention what your other symptoms are nor what anti-Parkinson’s meds you’re taking. This might be good to know. Part of my insomnia is due to not being able to get into a comfortable position –I toss and turn– but I think this may be a PD symptom so I’ve started taking half a Sinemet tab just before bed.

        All the best,
        Lou

        • #16704
          Jo S.
          Participant

          Hi, Maria. I can totally relate to what you and Lou said. Insomnia and restless legs are killers for me. Here’s what I’m currently taking before bedtime: magnesium citrate, C/L ER (two of them, per my doctor’s suggestion), melatonin, and medical cannabis. This combo sometimes helps, sometimes doesn’t. The RLS typically kicks in by 4:30 a.m., if it hasn’t lng before then. When it does, I have to get up and move (exercise). I am SO frickin’ exhausted most of the time — I can’t even express how tired I get during the day. I know my husband is tired too as a side-effect of my kicking, trying to get comfortable in bed, and getting up at unholy hours of the night.

          I also still work full-time (I’m 65), and it’s tiring working and also dealing with PD (which is a full-time job in and of itself). I’m naturally an introvert, but I do like to socialize a bit. However, making plans for the evening is almost impossible, as by 7:30 I typically am ready to fall over (literally!).

    • #16707
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      dan, that is an interesting symptom, one that has not affected me.  we are also different in our manifestations of the disease

    • #16708
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      jo and maria,

      insomnia sounds awful… i am blessed  do not suffer from that.  although i am exhausted when i wake up and the fatigue wears me down, but,  i am thankful i can still look forward to falling asleep at night and forgetting about pd for a few hours.

    • #16719
      Mary Beth Skylis
      Keymaster

      Maria,

      Have you discovered any strategies that reduce insomnia?

    • #16809
      Vickie Paul
      Participant

      One of my exercise instructors recommended a magnesium supplement for my restless leg syndrome. I take M.Oxide, 250 mg once a day at bedtime. I also get 150 mg in my daily multivitamin. It has helped tremendously.

      Right now my biggest challenge is freezing and slowness. It takes forever to get out of bed, or the car, or up from the couch. When I get upright and balanced, then I have to wait to get unfrozen.

    • #16811
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      vicki, i take magnesium also, not sure if it helps but i do sleep good (always have).  my slowness is almost comical.  the winter is the worst since i wear so many layers.  the other day, i was trying to figure out how to put on my pants, i had to sit down for about 5 minutes fiddling with trying to get my legs through the pants.  i wish i had a video of me doing that.  i am sure it would have been hilarious.  i felt like i was in a vat of molasses!

    • #16831
      Alan Ascher
      Participant

      Constipation is the least talked about, and most bothersome to ME…..Always gotta’ know where the bathroom is….then you find it..and then you can’t go!   What the hell is THAT about…. Of course “sticky feet” in the shower and at a stop light is another symptom I hate……

       

    • #16846
      Jean Mellano
      Keymaster

      alan, thnx for sharing. luxkily xonatipation has not hit me yet… did u know there is an APP call Flush that uses GPS to tell you where the nearest public bathroom is..  invaluable!

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