Lindsey Shapiro, PhD, science writer —

Lindsey earned her PhD in neuroscience from Emory University in Atlanta, where she studied novel therapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. She was awarded a fellowship from the American Epilepsy Society in 2019 for this research. Lindsey also previously worked as a postdoctoral researcher, studying the role of inflammation in epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.

Articles by Lindsey Shapiro

Trial to determine if SIS imaging system makes DBS more effective

Surgical Information Sciences (SIS) has opened a clinical trial to evaluate whether its visualization technology system for locating brain structures can enhance the accuracy of implant placement during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery in people with Parkinson’s disease. Called VISION (NCT05774041), the observational and postmarketing study…

Possible blood biomarkers of Parkinson’s fatigue identified

Blood levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a), an inflammatory molecule, and phosphorylated alpha-synuclein, a Parkinson’s disease biomarker, could be used to distinguish Parkinson’s patients with or without fatigue. Those findings from a recent study suggest the two markers may be  “promising biomarkers in discriminating PD [Parkinson’s disease] with…

Mouse study sheds light on alpha-synuclein buildup in the gut

Recent research in mice has revealed possible mechanisms by which alpha-synuclein protein is transported from blood cells in circulation to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where the protein is then thought to travel to the brain to drive Parkinson’s disease. Cellular carriers called extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from red blood…

Review study evaluates botulinum for treating excessive drooling

Botulinum toxin was found to be relatively safe and effective for treating excessive drooling in people with Parkinson’s disease, according to a recent systematic review and meta-analysis of previous clinical trials. While side effects usually were mild, the researchers believe larger and longer studies are needed to establish the…

Cognitive tests given virtually can be helpful, but more work needed

Cognition tests given virtually showed results similar to in-person evaluations for Parkinson’s disease patients with no or mild cognitive impairments, but more work clearly is needed to overcome their technical limitations and improve their reliability, according to a recent study. “In-person cognitive testing with a neuropsychologist remains the gold…

NfL levels may mediate link between dementia, LRRK2 variants

Scientists have discovered that long-term changes in a biomarker of nerve damage, called neurofilament light chain (NfL), could be used to predict cognitive decline in people with Parkinson’s disease due to certain mutations. They found that a slower progression of dementia in people with LRRK2-associated Parkinson’s compared with those…