Parkinson’s Foundation Opens Fellowship Program for Nurses Seeking Specialty

Parkinson’s Foundation Opens Fellowship Program for Nurses Seeking Specialty

The Parkinson’s Foundation has established a first Parkinson’s Nurse Fellowship program in the U.S., offering one year of training and support to working nurses who want to specialize in treating people with this progressive disease.

Applications are being accepted through Feb. 20 for the fellowship, worth up to $95,000 each, from registered nurses or those with a bachelor of science in nursing who have at least five years of experience and are interested in a career in Parkinson’s disease (PD) care and research.

The four fellows selected will be notified by March 10, the foundation announced in a press release.

They will undergo a yearlong training and mentoring at one of two sites: Oregon Health & Science University in Portland,  and the Struther’s Parkinson’s Center in Minneapolis.  Each is a Parkinson’s Centers of Excellence, a global network of 48 clinical centers recognized for their high quality of care for those with this disease.

“We recognize the crucial role that nurses play in caring for people with Parkinson’s disease,” said John L. Lehr, president and CEO of the Parkinson’s Foundation. “From ensuring medications are administered on time to supporting the transitions of care, they are consistently on the front lines of the PD community.

“This fellowship provides them with a unique training opportunity to enter the Parkinson’s space equipped with knowledge and first-hand research experience.”

Each fellow will be assigned a mentor to guide their learning about Parkinson’s. Awardees will also receive clinical training, and be expected to identify and design a research project.

Following the fellowship, fellows will be given a $50,000 grant to pursue and complete their research project.

Applicants should expect to work in the United States after finishing their fellowship.

“With this fellowship opportunity, we want to build a community of Parkinson’s nurse experts who not only know how to offer the best treatment possible for people with Parkinson’s, but also contribute to research on Parkinson’s and the roles nurses play,” said Eli Pollard, the foundation’s vice president, and chief training and education officer.

More information about this fellowship program is available here.

An estimated 1 million people in the United States are living with PD.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Total Posts: 208
Ana holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Lisbon and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) in Lisbon, Portugal. She graduated with a BSc in Genetics from the University of Newcastle and received a Masters in Biomolecular Archaeology from the University of Manchester, England. After leaving the lab to pursue a career in Science Communication, she served as the Director of Science Communication at iMM.
×
Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Latest Posts
  • physical therapy
  • medical cannabis
  • RARE Courage survey
  • nurses