Inspiring Books About Parkinson’s Disease

Inspiring Books About Parkinson’s Disease

I’ve always been a bookworm. From a young age, I’d collect stacks of dusty literature at the library and vanish in between the pages. Stories helped me learn about the complexities in life. I was often attracted to odysseys, in which an unassuming character went on a quest to learn and grow, ultimately becoming better for it. My habit of seeking answers in between the sentences still keeps me motivated, but today I want to share some texts that might help others find some answers, too.

Alternative medicine

Fighting Parkinson’s…and Winning: A memoir of my recovery from Parkinson’s Disease,” by Howard Shifke

Shifke claims to have cured his Parkinson’s through the use of traditional Chinese medicine, empowered by his belief that the body has the ability to heal itself. He delves into physical, emotional, and spiritual healing techniques involved in his Recipe for Recovery. Since the book’s publication, six other Parkinson’s patients claim to have made a full recovery using this method.

Yoga Therapy: Foundations, Methods, and Practices for Common Ailments,” by Mark Stephens

Delving into the yogic world of healing, this book offers suggestions for the management of many diseases. Stephens suggests that the structure of our life (in reference to diet, exercise, relationships, and other subsets of how we function) relates to our well-being. While the main emphasis isn’t on Parkinson’s, Stephens sheds light on practical strategies for anyone who struggles with an ailment.

Caregiving

Everything You Need to Know About Caregiving for Parkinson’s Disease,” by Lianna Marie

Marie shares her own experience as a caregiver in this text, giving pointers on topics like managing hallucinations, assisting with medications, and Parkinson’s proofing your home. She focuses on topics that’ll keep an equilibrium in your relationship, giving tips to help with mealtimes and sleeping. Additional topics of discussion include risk management (i.e., taking a Red Cross class) and creating boundaries for yourself within the caregiving relationship.

Biographies and memoirs

Ali: A Life,” by Jonathan Eig

Muhammad Ali was one of the world’s most famous boxers. He stepped into the ring for the first time as a 12-year-old and ultimately became a champion, but his fight didn’t end with his boxing career. This book details Ali’s life and his struggle with Parkinson’s. Ali publicly announced his illness just a few years after he retired from his life as a fighter. Eig conducted a study of Ali’s speech patterns to determine when he might’ve begun to show symptoms of Parkinson’s.

Lucky Man: A Memoir,” by Michael J. Fox

This memoir shares the story of a man who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s as a 30-year-old. With humor, poise, and elegance, Fox illuminates his journey with the disease, admitting that he struggled in silence for seven years before making the public announcement. He says that his diagnosis gave him as much as it took away, allowing him to be a mouthpiece for change. Profits from this book are donated to Parkinson’s research.

Final thoughts

Whether you’re looking for answers or are interested in other people’s stories, sometimes literature offers a terrific way to explore reality. What have other warriors experienced? What does caregiving look like and how might I make my own journey a little less bumpy? What might alternative medicine do for me? If you’re lucky, you’ll find some answers between the pages of a good book.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

Mary Beth is a Freelance Writer who specializes in personal narratives. Her work focuses on the outdoors and the transformative powers of nature. But when her Dad was diagnosed with Parkinsons in 2013, her search to understand the disease materialized through language.
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Mary Beth is a Freelance Writer who specializes in personal narratives. Her work focuses on the outdoors and the transformative powers of nature. But when her Dad was diagnosed with Parkinsons in 2013, her search to understand the disease materialized through language.

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