‘Framing OFF Through Art’ Exhibit on View at World Parkinson Congress

‘Framing OFF Through Art’ Exhibit on View at World Parkinson Congress

More than 1 in every 3 — some 40 percent — of Parkinson’s patients have “off periods,” the return of motor and non-motor symptoms as the effectiveness of a  treatment’s dose wears off. Artworks created in collaboration with patients, part of an Acorda Therapeutics program, are helping to express what these periods are like and focus attention on them.

Called Framing OFF Through Art, the six-piece exhibition was recently featured at the 5th World Parkinson Congress in Kyoto, Japan, attended by more than 3,000 people from at least 60 countries. The initiative is the centerpiece of Acorda’s Live Well. Do Tell program, launched last year.

Off periods are characterized by the re-emergence of Parkinson’s symptoms, such as sadness and anxiety, when the effects of levodopa/carbidopa wear off. Such episodes are typically more common as the disease progresses, and vary from person to person.

Because off periods can be difficult to discuss or even identify, the artwork is intended to visualize feelings associated with them. The hope is that the art will spur other patients to recognize their “off” symptoms, and discuss them with their care team. The artists who created the pieces have been touched in some way by Parkinson’s.

”Research has consistently shown that off periods are among the most common issues for people living with Parkinson’s disease,” Ron Cohen, MD, Acorda president and chief executive officer, said in a news release.

“We believe that people with Parkinson’s will be able to see aspects of their own experiences with Parkinson’s and off periods in these works of art.”

The artwork ranges from acrylic sculptures to oil paintings. Each artist was paired with two patients and their caregivers. The exhibition debuted in October at a New York event where the artists, patients and caregivers were guests. The need to better understand off periods, as well as how to discuss them, is highlighted in the Live Well. Do Tell statement of need.

As part of a rotating series, a piece called “Rooted Resilience” is featured on the Live Well. Do Tell website. Created by abstract impressionist and colorist Tim Kinney, who has several friends with Parkinson’s, the multi-color painting of a tree depicts the way Gustavo Pavon, diagnosed in 2006, described his off periods.

The painting’s transition from dark roots to the brightness of the leaves and sky is meant to illustrate emergence from an off time.

Marcela Del Bosque, Pavon’s wife and caregiver, is mentioned in a narrative accompanying the painting as describing the transition in this way:

“When Marcela saw the painting, she immediately picked up on this and noted that when Gustavo is in a dark place — in an off period — he’s quiet and doesn’t smile. Then, Gustavo’s bright smile that she loves reappears and he returns.”

The work’s branches and colors also symbolize Pavon’s growth — his “branching out” —  to embrace community support and speak more openly about his experience. For nearly a decade, Pavon had only told a few people about his condition and off symptoms that include shivering and stiffness.

Go here to learn more about off periods and for additional resources.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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