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    • #16816
      Garrett McAuliffe
      Participant

      I am working as a professor in my 10th year since diagnosis. I would like to continue. But I can’t multitask but do too many tasks in a row. Plus I experience apathy on a gut level while still being interested in my work, on a thinking level. I wonder how it is for others who are working with PD. 

    • #16821
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      hi garrett, i am retired, but i can no longer multi task and must be very mindful of everything i do, even walking.  i also suffer from apathy and must push myself to exercise, something I used to love to do.

    • #16870
      Scott Milstein
      Participant

      I was diagnosed in September but realistically had the symptoms for two years. I told the COO and the owner mainly due to the fact the owner is a relative, though not my direct supervisor. I’m not sure that if that wasn’t the case I would have told them. They have been great to me. My supervisors mother has MS so he has a frame of reference.

    • #16871
      Mary Beth Skylis
      Moderator

      Hey Scott,

      I can imagine that the diagnosis was tough to hear. But it sounds like you have a supportive community. Do you think your work environment will stay the same for the time being?

    • #16878
      Scott Milstein
      Participant

      I think so. They want me to do my job and do what I need to do to try to stay healthy. I worry a bit because I drive a lot for the job but I’m taking one day at a time.

    • #16910
      Garrett McAuliffe
      Participant

      i just lost a whole message in which i illustrated my day of running from one task to another. The day was then filled with symptoms and dyskinesia. I taught my class while dyskinetic. It is clear that “stress,” which can simply be concentrating on a task, or rushing, or even doing exercise, triggers symptoms AND dyskinesia. The message I am hearing is that we MUST reduce stress. While cutting back on activities, it also means relaxed walking (not rushing), periodic meditation, and evoking calmness in my body instead of plowing on. I got revved up yesterday, which has been my style (doing lots of things fast). I have an understanding boss and an ADA designation, which gives me accommodations for my job. I still have “it” in terms of mental clarity, and want to engage in the work I love. So my mantra must be: “My ambition exceeds my ability.” And that means acceptance. No comparisons to others who don’t have PD. And paying attention to internal cues that i am feeling “tight,” such as when concentrating for a long period of time. I do hear the idea of considering work options. But my work isn’t laborious or noxious to me.

    • #16929
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      garret, i am a type A personality and must consciously remind myself to slow down.  there is no doubt stress makes my symptoms worse.

    • #17556
      Tina
      Participant

      Garrett I can really relate to what you said and I like your mantra “My ambition exceeds my ability.” On an hourly basis! I’ve come to accept my need to sit down and clear my mind before I start the next task.

      Jean I was always a type A too and I still have a long list of “to dos”.  I’ve tried to focus on prioritizing and literally patting myself on the back when I complete a task. Seems childish to me but it works so I’m going with it! I’ve found that there is never a moment when I have an empty list. So I’ve come to accept that it’s just how my mind works, always has.

      When I’ve looked back at my life I feel I’ve accomplished everything I’ve set out to do and it’s all gravy now! I’m excited about whatever comes my way, and my next big goal is to maintain courage and dignity in dealing with this PD.

    • #17562
      Mary Beth Skylis
      Moderator

      Tina,

      you have such a great attitude. I have a tendency to lean towards type A behaviors too, so I can relate. It’s pretty tough for me to slow down and pat myself on the back too. But it sounds like you’re doing a great job of it, and recognizing your progress. I think attitude goes a long way when we’re facing challenges.

    • #17565
      Garrett McAuliffe
      Participant

      I feel like I’m one member of the club of trying to slow down and pause and not multitask or many-task!as I look at what I have accomplished in my life and my career, I can rest assured that I did well in many areas and feel good about that meaning was clear when I was raising children and when I was a full-time professor. BUT – as my paid work declines, which gave me great meaning as I said, what do I do instead? I have limited abilities to perform music, which has been one of my meaningful activities, although I can do this in limited ways. Enjoy moment to moment living is good: sunny day, the smell of coffee, and more. But the adjustment to a slower pace and finding activities that are meaningful is my challenge. Perhaps anyone who retires faces that challenge. PD complicates that. Pacing myself is all good, but in my body won’t let me I want to say something in the house or teach a course, I must find another pleasant or meaningful activity. It was easy during the furious days of career and family raising. Now slowing down still provides the challenge of what to aim for. Just some thoughts…

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