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    • #15749
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      In the below article, HIIT exercise is recommended for PwP.  However, my PD fatigue is so crushing, I can never work hard enough to get my heart rate up. (I used to be an athlete that trained high intensity prior to diagnosis).

      Does  PD caused fatigue affect your ability to exercise, especially HIIT?

      High Intensity Interval Training May Benefit Patients with Parkinson’s, Pilot Study Shows

    • #16792
      Vickie Paul
      Participant

      I am 72, diagnosed in 2013. I tried several HIIT cycling classes at the YMCA. I loved the company, our sometimes black comedy like the time one of the cyclists was headed to the floor and the instructor made an incredible save, cradling his head. The rest of us erupted into clapping, hi-fives, whistles and catcalls, mystifying other gym rats.
      But, the agony of those itty bitty bicycle seats, and the effect of the hunched form on the lower back made me give it up. Instead I gravitated to the gentle yoga classes, TaiChi, and Feldenkrais, popular in Europe and the U.K. They describe it as Awareness through Movement, where a skilled practitioner guides you through a very individualized program of finding a different set of muscles and neurons to circumvent the effects of loss caused by Parkinson’s. It’s a very adaptable approach to the myriad of seemingly random body part failures.
      An example: I have severe osteoarthritis of the knee, so painful I have to limit any walking. My instructor worked with me on transferring weight side to side, using areas of the foot and ankle to grip the floor, then establish a rolling effect of the feet front to back, walking, but using a different neural pathway. From there she steered me through opening the pelvis, letting it take on more structural support. The effect of these conscious movements shifts pressure away from the knee, so walking is less painful. She also noticed I pair arm and leg on the same side when I walk, rather than diagonal right leg/left arm and left leg/ right arm. Changing to the diagonals improves balance and stability. Though It’s hard to change something as basic as walking this approach is helpful.
      Overcoming fatigue is a huge problem. But since I like exercise class more than stuff I should be doing like paying bills, laundry, housework, etc., I play hooky by going to class. My regimen is very non threatening, much of it done seated or on the floor, so I don’t dread the experience. And I can’t begin to thank my fellow classmates and instructors enough for their encouragement and friendship. In short!!, I encourage everyone to exercise, but i don’t think it has to be hi intensity to be helpful.

      – [ ]

    • #16793
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      Hi Vickie thnx for responding.  I am still trying to accept the fact that I cannot do high intensity exercise due to my fatigue. (I used to be a Spinning instructor).  Now, I am happy if I can walk 1/2 mile and not be wasted for the rest of the day lol

    • #16794
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      Hi Vickie thnx for responding.  I am still trying to accept the fact that I cannot do high intensity exercise due to my fatigue. (I used to be a Spinning instructor).  Now, I am happy if I can walk 1/2 mile and not be wasted for the rest of the day lol

    • #16795
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      Hi Vickie thnx for responding.  I am still trying to accept the fact that I cannot do high intensity exercise due to my fatigue. (I used to be a Spinning instructor).  Now, I am happy if I can walk 1/2 mile and not be wasted for the rest of the day lol

    • #17652
      Robert Harris
      Participant

      When I was taking physical therapy for Parkinson’s a few years ago, I noticed that after vigorous exercise I was exhausted. When I told my PTs, they always said that it couldn’t be: Everyone knows that exercise releases endorphins and dopamine,which makes you feel great, even though you might be tired. That is the physiological model they are tied to, which they learn in all their training.

      In my opinion,  the model is accurate for normal people.  When normal people exercise, more dopamine is created and the signaling continues. But Parkies can’t make any more dopamine to match the increased need, so what little they have is oxidized, leaving  the exerciser with a feeling of exhaustion and weakness. Parfkies who feel exhausted all the time might need a dosage adjustment. If I feel off before I exercise, I take a booster of 12.5/50 (half a 25/100 IR pill) 20 or 30 minutes before. (Caution: Always consult your neurologist before changing dosage or timing.)

      More powerful than the pill as a booster is a new powdered form of levodopa that is inhaled. While the swallowed pill has to risk being destroyed by protein, inhaling it bypasses the entire intestinal tact. (I’m not mentioning the name so this won’t sound like an advertisement. Ask your neurologist.)

      Of course, as is always recommended, Take your regular dopamine doses at least an hour before or after eating protein.

       

    • #17672
      Mary Beth Skylis
      Keymaster

      Robert,

      That’s a really interesting point. I hadn’t quite made that connection. I don’t have PD, but I’ve been ill for a long period of time before. And I know what it feels like to be taxed by even simple tasks.

      When you time your meds differently, do you find that you have enough power to get through your workouts?

    • #17691
      Shannan
      Participant

      I’m 39 and diagnosed 5 years ago; just had DBS in October.  It seems like fatigue has been a predominant part of my entire life.  I used to dance with a local dance studio for 12 years and I played softball in my pre-teens and teens. But I found I always loved a long nap. ..I mean 2 to 3 hours!  Now with Parkinson’s I’m exhausted all the time.  My challenging days even more so. I wish I could walk 1/2 a mile.  I’m just glad to get across the short parking lot into my office without using all my energy! I have a gym membership and I know it’s good to prevent disease progression but I’m so tired I just go home after work.  I’m still trying to work, raise a 3 1/2 year old daughter, get to the point where I have energy to play with her, be a wife and not an exhausted shell, and keep up  with my household duties. It’s tough to say the least.

    • #17692
      Jean Mellano
      Participant

      Hi shannan

      i too suffer from extreme fatigue and used to be a dancer.   For me , the fatigue can be so debilitating and no amount of sleep or rest can make me feel better.lack of motivation and apathy pl ague me and if I didn’t go on ‘autopilot’ to get to my workouts.   I can’t imagine going to work (I am retired) and taking care of a family while in this state.  I wish you strength to keep at the exercise.  I am convinced that exercise is key in staving off this disease .

       

      if u can find a rock steady boxing class near you, I highly recommend it. There is nothing like the support and encouragement you get from fellow participants in the class (everyone has pd.

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