Viewing 22 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #16545
      Ally
      Keymaster

      Driving is one of the most important things that we do on a daily basis, as for many of us, it is how we get to work, school and various appointments and social events. Driving gives us independence and freedom. (Remember when you were in high school and got your license for the first time? I don’t think that feeling ever goes away!)

      Having Parkinson’s can definitely impact a person’s ability to drive, or even just their confidence behind the wheel, but everyone’s situation will be unique to them. If/when a person with PD stops driving will be dependent on their own personal experience with the disease.

      Are you still driving? If you’re not, when and how did you decide to stop driving? How do you feel about that decision?

    • #16549
      Dan
      Participant

      I still have my license. But I do not drive any more. It is difficult. I have a spouse that can still drive. I am afraid to operate a vehicle on the public hi ways, streets, freeways, ect. PD effects are far too risky.  One of the burdens – plus living in a rural ( frontier) setting complicates the matter.

      Just being somewhat ambulatory is challenge a-plenty.

       

      • #24207
        George Sharp
        Participant

        I still have my license i do agree that it is something you have to deal with in a induvial basic’, I have always promised myself that if the day comes i have any trouble i will stop. It is a hard thing to do but i would rather give up or be in a situation where i was forced into it. and when i think back I was driving at 14 and had a proper license when i was 16 so i turn 78 in a couple of months so i have had a good run with it , but will miss it when it is gone .George

      • #24224
        Beth T Browne
        Participant

        I still can drive.  I live alone, so am not looking forward to not be able to drive.  My car may give out before me.

    • #16550
      Dan
      Participant

      I voluntarily stopped driving. Conventional wisdom suggests that when everyone in the vehicle is afraid when a person drives, probably time to move that person to a seat with no controls.

       

       

      • #16602
        Ally
        Keymaster

        That probably wasn’t an easy decision to make, Dan, but I applaud you for deciding for yourself when to stop driving instead of waiting for something to happen. I was visiting my parents in my rural hometown recently and we don’t have public transit or even Uber. It must be frustrating sometimes not to be able to get in your car and drive where you need to go, especially if services are far away!

    • #16556
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      good for you Dan, i still drive and hope that I can make the right decision to stop when the time is right. I can relate to living in a rural area.  mass transit leaves a lot to be desired where i live

    • #16572
      Jeffery Hill
      Participant

      I’m still early stage, and still driving, however I’m carefully planning long distance drives:

      1. If I leave in the morning, OK to drive alone

      2. If I leave after lunch, I prefer to have a co-pilot with whom I can switch if I get drowsy

      3. Never start a long distance drive in the evening.  Losing confidence in night vision.

      • #16603
        Ally
        Keymaster

        That’s a great set of practices to abide by, Jeffery. Thanks for sharing.

    • #16589
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Jeffrey, me too… I don’t like driving at night and love having a copilot especially on drives greater than 45 minutes

    • #16597
      Jo S.
      Participant

      I’m still driving, but I don’t drive very often, and when I do, it’s only very close to home and never at night. I don’t see well at night and I don’t totally trust my judgment then. I’m also afraid of getting drowsy if I travel too far from home, so my husband (thankfully) does nearly all the driving.

      • #16604
        Ally
        Keymaster

        Makes sense to me, Jo, and I’m glad your husband can help with driving too. Do you miss being able to drive more consistently/independently?

    • #16599
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      jo

      i think that sums it up for a lot of us…. i am thankful it is not my gas pedal side (right side) that is affected by PD.. yet

    • #16608
      John
      Participant

      Yes still drive. Tend not to drive after dark. If Symptomatic Will not drive or will pull over or time my Driving Accordingly Re. Meds

      don’t drive on the highway anymore leave it to my wife or others.

    • #16611
      Jo S.
      Participant

      Hi, Ally. Fortunately, my husband enjoys driving, so he’s always done the bulk of it. I work from home (I have done so for decades — long before it was cool — haha!), so I don’t really have to do much driving. Consequently, I don’t feel the pinch or the loss of independence the way that many other PWP might. I’m lucky in that regard. If I were navigating PD on my own, I think not driving would be significantly more debilitating.

    • #16612
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      hi john, it is good to know our limitations with this disease. i hope, when the time comes, that i can turn in my car keys..  i no longer drive at night and avoid long drives if possible

    • #16659
      Toni Shapiro
      Participant

      Hi, I stopped driving almost 4 months ago. I was slower to respond to the brake and my anxiety when driving made symptoms worse including for a minute or two forgetting where I was going or where I was. I love driving and was the main driver in the family so it was very difficult to give it up voluntary, however, a car can be a killing machine and I needed to choose responsibility over my ego. I have found taking the bus makes me feel very good about myself and that I do have some control over my PD situation. Taking the bus gives me an independence without worry or concern and it turns out I like it. Now with may car sold and I see my empty parking space I can actually see the positives of letting it go.

    • #16665
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      toni, that is excellent you knew when the time was right to stop driving.  as it is with most things related to PD, we have to find workarounds and you using mass transit is good for you and the environment.  plus you are taking a positive attitude which helps tremendously.  good for you!

    • #16769
      Frank Mundo
      Participant

      I drive night or day, no problems.  I feel some anxiety in large parking lots when backing out of vision restricted slots. I am ready to give it up when problems arise.

    • #16770
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Frank, that is great that you can drive day or night with no problems.   i have had anxiety backing out of vision restricted slots before I had PD LOL

    • #24208
      UMAKANT PANCHOLI
      Participant

      I gave up driving a year ago. My right side is affected and being driving in the UK it would have impacted my automatic car driving a little difficult. I have givenn up my driving licence as I did not want to risk the lives of people who are in my car and also the general public. My daughter is the only driver in my house, so she takes me to all my appointments.

      • #24217
        Ally
        Keymaster

        Hi Umakant, thank you for sharing. How does it feel to rely on someone else for all the driving? Do you find it helpful and relaxing or do you miss the freedom / autonomy of driving yourself?

    • #24212
      Dresh
      Participant

      In high school, I had a colleague with Parkinson’s. At some point, he understood he couldn’t drive anymore, and the doctors suggested he do the same. He tried to get a fake driver’s license without any restriction.

    • #24218
      Ron Lusk
      Participant

      Two years ago, I decided to stop driving. It used to be about 90% of the driving for our family including road trips hauling a trailer. When we had to shut down the business because of my PD was when I also stopped driving. My wife does all the driving now and it limits what I can do like shopping for birthdays, etc.; but it is safer this way.

    • #24228
      Don Harris
      Participant

      I am still driving as normal including long trips and at this stage (8 years since diagnosis) PD seems to have had little, if any, affect on driving ability.

      If/when it does I will find it very hard to give up a lifetime of mainly enjoyable driving but my wife is a good driver and will step into the breach.

    • #24229
      Dresh
      Participant

      In high school, I had a colleague with Parkinson’s. At some point, he understood he couldn’t drive anymore, and the doctors suggested he do the same. He tried to get a fake driver’s license without any restriction. Even if the guys he bought the license told him they are extremely accurate, nobody can detect them. It was detected as a fake once he scanned it through the first id scanner https://www.idanalyzer.com/products/prime-id-scanner.html. So, it’s better not to try and know it’s safer for you and others to stop driving.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Dresh.
    • #24234
      Gauri
      Participant

      Yes I do have a driving licence and I practice driving on a four wheeler as well as a two wheeler as a matter of fact I am very very stable while driving I enjoyed driving city driving as well as Expressway driving I am very comfortable driving a two wheeler as well.

    • #24258

      It is very good to read and participate in this discussion and be a member of this network. I am from Iceland and we don’t have any network the same as you have. I am not good at writing English so I hope you will forgive my Google Translate English.

      I have my driver’s license but stopped driving 6 months ago and sold my car. I thought it was best for me to stop driving a car before putting someone in that situation to point out I could not be trusted to drive my grandchildren. We, men, think sometimes we know what is best for us and nobody can tell us how to live our lives, but when I was diagnosed with Parkins’s I stopped thinking that way.

      Here in my hometown Hafnarfjördur we have a minibus service for disabled people to drive me where ever I will and need to go. I started using it in the same week I stopped driving and it felt relaxing.

      I live alone but have had a female friend for 20 years with who I can shear my thoughts and feelings. We are in a “distance relationship” meeting at weekends and sometimes in the middle of the week. She is still working but I retired 2 years ago so it is good for me to be not so dependent on her asking her to drive me during working hours.

      It takes the minibus half an hour to drive to Reykjavík where the doctors are and the hospital so all driving distances are not time-consuming.

      It wasn’t very hard for me to stop driving but there are many other matters I am thinking about at the moment concerning my Parkinson’s disease so maybe It will strike me later.
      Thanks.

    • #24291
      Jim Brennan
      Participant

      I’m still driving thankfully and have had no significant degradation in skills while on Carba/Levodopa. However, the meds I started on, don’t remember the name, caused all sorts of problems including a real degradation in driving skills. Once moved to Carba/levodopa I saw immediate improvement.

Viewing 22 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

©2022 KLEO Template a premium and multipurpose theme from Seventh Queen

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account

Verify you are not a robot