Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #23108
      Mary Beth Skylis
      Moderator

      Ever since my dad was diagnosed with Parkinson’s, life seems to have a shortness to it. I’m more conscious about the time I spend with my loved ones. And I’ve re-calibrated my habits to focus on my relationships. Have you noticed any silver-linings from your own diagnosis? Or your loved one’s diagnosis? What blessings are in your life?

    • #23230
      Krukar
      Participant

      Great question Mary Beth I have not encountered limits from my diagnosis yet. The first thing I researched was how this diagnosis could shorten my life. The research suggested it would shorten my life by 2 years. Mainly because of falling. My new life has more definition.  I care more about my wife. God has blessed my life. I exercise more which helps my flexibility. I view Parkinson’s as a challenge. Thanks for the question Mary Beth. Blessings, Mike

       

       

       

       

       

      • #23231
        Mary Beth Skylis
        Moderator

        Thank you for your response, Krukar. Have you implemented any strategies that might be able to lower the risk of falling? We have a few grab bars across our house for my dad in key locations like in the bathroom and at the front door. I know he also uses furniture to stabilize himself sometimes.

    • #23244
      Andrew L.
      Participant

      I view myself as a stronger person (mentally and physically) than I thought was possible before being diagnosed. I use the diagnosis as a reason to take the best care of my physical and  mental  health as is humanly possible. When my body and mind allows me to do these things, I  feel good about myself.   I view small victories (still doing things that I could do before) as victories, not something I take for granted. I  sometimes view overcoming the obstacles to being on a heroic journey on which I am a warrior.  I am enlarging my community of friends and feel great kinship with my fellow warriors who have this diagnosis.

    • #23245
      Krukar
      Participant

      We have installed several grab bars in our home as a practical way to avoid falling. They help especially for nighttime trips to the bathroom. I also have a Kegels Self Care home program which has also reduced my bathroom trips at night. We also got a new lower bed and special sheets which make moving in bed much easier. I think that being proactive versus this culprit has it’s own positive effects. Thanks for asking. Blessings to you and your Dad,  Mike

       

       

    • #23260
      Marlene Donnelly
      Participant

      My first comment is to Krukar:  Have you tried a class of T’ai Chi (yoga helps too)?  I have had PD for 11 years.  I often fell during the first couple of years but then took a T’ai Chi Chih class because I read that it could help.  Since then I have hardly fallen at all!  I rarely lose my balance anymore, ans when I do I am able to catch myself before actually falling.  I strongly recommend it!

      Now for the silver linings of PD.  For me there are definitely two.  The first I have called my Parkinson’s Perk for many years.  I have lost my sense of smell, but not to food.  I can’t smell poop!  Dog poop, cat poop, baby poop!  I may be a loving grandma, but everyone knows not to depend upon me to know when a diaper change is needed.  Same with the litter box for our two cats.  On the other hand, if the smell is so horrendous, my family comes to get me because I can do the cleaning up with a minimum of problem since I can’t smell it.

      The other silver lining was pointed out to me in a class I have been taking on mindfulness.  There has been a lot of discussion on how everyone is expected to multitask throughout the day.  I have NEVER been able to multitask, but now I just say, “Sorry, I have PD.  One task at a time is all I can do.”

      • #23296
        twok
        Participant

        love your comments

    • #23263
      Krukar
      Participant

      Marlene,

      Thank-you for the suggestion. I have been doing a particular balance routine plus other stuff especially LSVT. I am very cautious and have not fallen for a couple years now. Thanks for your kind suggestion.

      Blessings, Mike

       

       

       

       

       

    • #23292
      John Citron
      Participant

      After my diagnosis, I became more aware of the world around me. I follow storms and severe weather, even went storm chasing when I could do it physically as well as financially and enjoy the outdoors overall more the beauty that mother nature has given us.

      I also cherish my family closer than I ever did. When we’re young, we go passing through life as if we’re driving on the highway. Today, I take the backroads and enjoy what’s around me.

      Marlene also hit the nail on the head. As someone who also takes care of pets and an aging parent, dealing with stink is part of the package. Before Mr. Parkinson joined my life, I couldn’t even walk into the room without gagging when it came time to clean up. Now, I just do it without the smell part.

      Not being able to multitask however is frustrating. It was due to this that I am no longer working. I couldn’t keep up with the pace and I was becoming more and more disorganized which for someone who works in IT is a bad thing.

      The other part is people think I’m “normal” and I can still do the same things the same way and get snappy at me for not doing instantly or not completing a task before moving on to another. They don’t understand! Our brains aren’t wired like they used to be.

      • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by John Citron.
    • #23355
      John Citron
      Participant

      Mary-Beth you are spot on!

      After I went through the five steps of denial and acceptance, I realized that there’s a lot more to the world than as we see it on a daily basis. As I said to someone one day the grass really is green, the sky has the most beautiful blue, and the flowers really are brightly colored. We don’t see it as the world whizzes by us like the world outside the window of the Acela train as it passes through the countryside.

      Like you, I also really cherish the people I have closest to me. As we go through life ever so quickly, we don’t realize what and who we have until they’re gone. Keep them as close to your heart and appreciate their presence as much as you can always.

    • #23357
      RIchard
      Participant

      Amen to that John!  In addition to cherishing and appreciating those who are closest to you, I’ve also taken up reuniting descendants of past generations that have been lost.  It’s fun and exciting to have family zoom meetings.  Getting started is simple:

      1. send your saliva sample to 23 and me

      2. Get a genealogy program like MyHeritage or Ancestry.com

      3. Start contact the relatives you find.

      I’ll be happy to help.

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

©2022 KLEO Template a premium and multipurpose theme from Seventh Queen

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account

Verify you are not a robot