MJFF Opens Fund for Research Into Minority, Other Overlooked Groups

MJFF Opens Fund for Research Into Minority, Other Overlooked Groups
0
(0)

To encourage more diversity in Parkinson’s investigations and better capture how the disorder affects patients across racial, socioeconomic, and other lines, The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) has opened an international program to fund projects that promote greater inclusion in Parkinson’s research.

Awarded projects could receive from $50,000 up to $400,000 in support, depending on the scope of their work, over a term of 18 to 36 months. Pre-proposals are due by April 21, and selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals by Aug 5.

Winners are expected to be announced by November, with project funding likely to start in December, the MJFF announced on a webpage.

Visit this site for more information, and to apply. You may also register for an hourlong informational webinar set for March 9 at 12 p.m. ET.

The MJFF is looking for applications aiming to increase knowledge about Parkinson’s in populations that have been historically excluded from, or underrepresented in, scientific investigations.

“Our understanding of the cause, progression, and treatment of PD [Parkinson’s disease] is growing but remains far from complete,” the organization stated in its announcement. “Unfortunately, most of this research has not been inclusive of the broader community of people with Parkinson’s.”

It’s unclear, the notice continued, how the neurodegenerative disease impacts patients and families across racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, sexuality, and geographic categories.

Such groups include Blacks, Asians, and Native Americans and other indigenous groups; Latinos; women; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual individuals; residents of areas underserved by current care and research efforts; and individuals of low socioeconomic status.

Scientists in non-profit and for-profit organizations globally, as well as some post-doctoral fellows, are eligible for the program. In particular, interdisciplinary teams of Parkinson’s scientists, community organizations, and researchers who focus on health disparities among seniors in underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

Applications should focus on one or more of these areas: disease burden, Parkinson’s risk and pathology within the social determinants of health and structural discrimination, assessment procedures across different cultures and differential response to treatment, how Parkinson’s progresses in different populations, and access to care.

“Though factors driving disparities in society are complex, researchers, doctors, and patient communities must make concerted efforts to eliminate inequities in healthcare,” the MJFF added.

“Making research more representative of the community will broaden our understanding of PD, which can only lead to strategies for reducing risk and developing treatments for all people.”

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Total Posts: 208
Ana holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Lisbon and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) in Lisbon, Portugal. She graduated with a BSc in Genetics from the University of Newcastle and received a Masters in Biomolecular Archaeology from the University of Manchester, England. After leaving the lab to pursue a career in Science Communication, she served as the Director of Science Communication at iMM.
×
Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
Latest Posts
  • Zarela Martinez's video series
  • Peruvian family and PD
  • tailored exercise
  • Parkinson's Revolution fundraiser

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?