Fox Foundation Awards $5M to Support Genetic Studies of Parkinson’s in Africa, Asia and India

Fox Foundation Awards $5M to Support Genetic Studies of Parkinson’s in Africa, Asia and India

With the overarching goal of helping scientists develop and test targeted therapies in Parkinson’s (PD), The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) is awarding $5 million in grants to three teams conducting genetic studies in African, East Asian and Indian populations.

The funding seeks to broaden these studies in order to better understand the role of genetics in PD onset and progression, and to expand treatment options for patients globally. Historically, the majority of research has focused on people of European descent. The grants will enable genetic testing of samples from more than 30,000 people.

“While the field has made significant strides in genetic research, we know we have more to learn about the changes in DNA that lead to Parkinson’s disease and impact its progression,” Brian Fiske, PhD, MJFF senior vice president of research programs, said a news release. “This is an all-star initiative with world-class geneticists, clinic networks and study volunteers coming together to paint a global picture of Parkinson’s and work toward cures for everyone.”

Since researchers discovered the first genetic mutation linked to PD in 1997, more than 80 others have been identified. Scientists are studying the cellular impact of these mutations, associated with about 15 percent of PD cases, in order to better understand Parkinson’s and possible ways of treating it.

Potential therapies aimed at proteins including LRRK2, one of the most commonly known genetic causes of Parkinson’s, are in clinical trials. Work like this is what the global Parkinson’s genetics program hopes to build upon. The non-profit foundation has long backed genetic studies, and diversity and inclusivity in clinical investigations.

Grants under this global program — with support from the Edmond J. Safra Foundation, a long-time partner of the Fox Foundation — will go to the following projects:

“Parkinson’s is a global issue, and we are grateful to The Michael J. Fox Foundation for fostering representation in research,” said Njideka Okubadejo, a professor of research at the University of Lagos in Nigeria. “We hope this partnership results in greater understanding of disease causes and contributors, and leads to new treatments for people living in Africa and beyond.”

Parkinson’s is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder (after Alzheimer’s), and estimated to affect 7 to 10 million people worldwide.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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Ana holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Lisbon and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) in Lisbon, Portugal. She graduated with a BSc in Genetics from the University of Newcastle and received a Masters in Biomolecular Archaeology from the University of Manchester, England. After leaving the lab to pursue a career in Science Communication, she served as the Director of Science Communication at iMM.
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Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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