Partnership Aims to Move Cannabis-Based Treatments for Parkinson’s into Clinical Testing

Partnership Aims to Move Cannabis-Based Treatments for Parkinson’s into Clinical Testing

India Globalization Capital (IGC) has joined with the nonprofit Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center (PICC) with the goal of moving cannabinoid-based treatments for Parkinson’s disease into clinical testing.

IGC, a company reported to be at the forefront of such Parkinson’s research, recently signed a Joint Development and Services Agreement with PICC  to identify goals and design clinical trials for Parkinson’s that might determine if cannabis-based treatments can help to ease disease symptoms, an article published by CFN Media Group reports.

PICC will assist in trial design and creating protocols using IGC’s cannabis extracted products. Dr. Carrolee Barlow, the center’s CEO, will lead these initiatives.

Medical cannabis is used by some Parkinson’s patients to treat symptoms. But the lack of clinical data precludes its recommendation by physicians because its effects on patients are not fully known.

IGC is conducting research on cannabis-based Serosapse for Parkinson’s patients. The treatment candidate is intended to ease several disease-related symptoms, such as rapid eye movement sleep disorder, incontinence, anxiety, and impairment of voluntary movement.

“We believe that cannabis-based compounds can become part of the solution to treat the symptoms of challenging and progressive medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and movement disorders,” Ram Mukunda, CEO of IGC, said in a company press release.  “Dr. Barlow and the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center are highly respected in the field and we look forward to working together to bring cannabis-based options to those afflicted by this difficult diagnosis.”

Parkinson’s is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. About one million Americans and 10 million people worldwide have the disease, and these numbers are expected to increasing as population’s age.

“We feel very fortunate to collaborate with IGC in a rigorous research approach to determine whether holistic cannabis products can alleviate the symptoms of Parkinson’s and movement disorders,” said Dr. Barlow. “This is an opportunity for the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center to participate in this scientific study to help Parkinson’s patients worldwide.”

4 comments

  1. Patrik Sjöblom says:

    My partner has Parkinsons and has been using cannabis(medical) now for almost two years. It has helped her a lot. It has a direct correlation with her sleep, before she slept anywhere from 2-4 hours now 6-8 so her cronic tiredness is more or less gone. And also before cannabis she was very stiff especially in the evenings, hard to understand her speech for example. That has improved significantly. She recently went overseas for two weeks and did not use cannabis, when she came home i was a bit shocked when i saw her, she was very stiff and weak, she had hardly slept she said. I gave her her evening dose and she slept over 10 hours. Now after 2 weeks home and taking cannabis every evening she is a lot stronger. So for us there is no question of its benefits at least regarding her.
    She is using a high CBD ca.8% and THC ca.6.5 % (Bediol)
    Occasionally she vaporises but she coughs a lot doing that so i bake her brownies, which also gives a longer effect.
    No adverse effects except it makes her so relaxed and sleepy that she cannot work when using it,that is why she only takes it in the evening during the week. A different strain might have a different effect, she has not tried another strain yet.
    So in conclusion i can say that i believe other Parkinson sufferers should give it a try, we are believers !
    P.S if someone would like to know how i make her baked cannabis medicine i would be happy to explain.

    • Carol Rothfeld says:

      I sent my application to Florida Dept. of Health in January. I was told it would take 6-8 weeks to get my card to purchase Medical Marijuana. I am still waiting.

  2. Laurie Pick says:

    We would be interested in being considered for the trial. My husband has Parkinson’s and I am the sole caretaker. Laurie P.

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